We don’t need more water in our tanks, study says

A major new study suggests the world is getting used to the water crisis gripping the planet.

The International Water Agency has published a report that shows that while some people are already feeling the pinch, most people have been living under water for far too long.

“Most people who are not in a particularly dire situation are already experiencing a water shortage,” the IWA report found.

The report also found that many of those living in the poorest regions of the world have access to cheap and abundant water but have little incentive to use it, and are reluctant to tap into it.

The United Nations and the World Food Programme have called on countries to invest in water infrastructure and programs to address the crisis.

In the report, the IEA and its partners said that the world has not yet met its own target for reducing the number of people on the planet who are facing water scarcity.

The world’s population is expected to reach 9 billion by 2100, and a further 8 billion will be added to that in the next 10 years, the report found, which is expected by 2030.

The new report says the current situation is not sustainable.

It says the world’s water infrastructure needs to be upgraded and developed, and governments should set priorities and prioritise water supply, and help people and communities use it.

It recommends that governments invest in upgrading infrastructure in developing countries, and that they should make sure the water infrastructure is not only safe, but also environmentally sustainable.

“The world will not be able to solve the water shortage until governments do the right thing and invest in the water supply,” IWA’s director general, Alvaro Paz, said.

“But that will take years, not decades, because it will require governments to act now, before water scarcity worsens further.”

He said that while the report is a sobering warning, it does not mean the world will never be in a water crisis.

“We don’t have a crisis.

It is only a matter of time,” he said.

Key findings from the report: A total of 1.6 billion people worldwide lack access to enough clean, safe water, or have insufficient access to water.

That is a 3% increase over 2010 levels.

The poorest countries have the highest water scarcity, with 6.7 billion people in sub-Saharan Africa and the Caribbean living in extreme poverty.

The World Bank has estimated that the global population is now expected to grow by about 2 billion to 8 billion by 2050, and by 7 billion to 13 billion by the end of the century.

But the report said that more than half of those who are already poor will have no access to safe water by 2030, and another 60% of those in extreme-poor countries will not have access by 2030 at all.

Most people are living under a water scarcity that has been exacerbated by human activities, especially agricultural and urban growth, and the use of water for drinking, cooking, and heating.

About half of the global poor are expected to have no water by 2050.

Water use has increased more than fivefold in poor countries, as has water consumption by both rich and poor countries.

Most poor people in developing nations have not benefited from improved water quality or sanitation, and their drinking water is unsafe.

“Poor people are still using more water than rich people and poorer people,” said IWA researcher Mariana Fajardo, the lead author of the report.

“Even if the water use by rich people is low, the impact on poor people is even worse. “

“People are already getting water from their gardens and drinking water from taps in their homes, and even though we are using less, we are still consuming a lot.” “

The report, which was published on Wednesday, was based on a detailed study of the water-use habits of 2.4 billion people around the world, and is the most comprehensive to-date on water scarcity in the world. “

People are already getting water from their gardens and drinking water from taps in their homes, and even though we are using less, we are still consuming a lot.” 

The report, which was published on Wednesday, was based on a detailed study of the water-use habits of 2.4 billion people around the world, and is the most comprehensive to-date on water scarcity in the world.

The study found that the use rate of a water source rose from about 1.2 billion litres per person per year in 1990 to 7.1 billion litres in 2030.

About one in five people in the developing world did not have enough access to clean, reliable water, the study found.

But even though the world population is projected to increase by 2.5 billion people by 2050 and more than 1 billion people will be in extreme poor countries by 2050 – the IWAS report said the world would not be in crisis without people living in those areas.

The study also found the water footprint of people in low- and middle-income countries rose from 7% in 1990 – to 17% by 2030 – and that the water footprints of people living outside poor countries grew from 0.3 billion litres to 4.6 million litres per capita in 2030,